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Car recall notices

This is my first post on what I hope to make a regular series: car recalls.

I know this information is available elsewhere. I’ll be using cars.com for this post, for instance, and you could just go there. But I think this sort of information is important enough to spread it around. And since I know a few people who will read this and would never think to go to a place like cars.com, I think it’s a useful service.

I’m passionate about this because I had a vehicle defect issue in the past. The seat belts weren’t installed properly, and it very nearly led to a serious problem. I was with my wife, and we stopped suddenly and the seat belt on her side of the car started to come apart. Thankfully, we weren’t going very fast and we were able to sort of slide to a stop instead of breaking hard or stopping instantly in an accident. Still, it was scary. And I still have nightmares about what might have happened.

So, the recalls:

There’s been a recall on the 2004-2006 Mitsubishi Lancer for an airbag problem. If you’ve got a Lancer from those years, make sure to get that checked out.

Lexus HS 250h sedans from 2010 also have a problem. The transaxle assembly can lead to parts of your car wearing down.

Several different versions of a very popular car, the Porsche Cayenne, from 2003-2006, are being recalled because of a fuel filter problem that can lead to fuel leaking out. That could actually lead to a fire, so get your Porsche in right away, folks.

Finally, my last recall notice for this first post, the Volkswagen Touareg, years 2004-2007: there’s a recall out for the same reason as the Porsche Cayenne directly above. This stuff is serious, so don’t put this off.

Trust me, you may not think these recalls are important and that nothing can happen to your good, dependable vehicle, but you’d be wrong. I’m not the only one to experience the results of a car that came broken. There are whole areas of law dedicated to suing car companies that don’t recall these things fast enough.

And keep in mind, any recall means someone else complained about it—and either sued or threatened to sue—loud enough that the car company felt it was in their interest to recall.

If the message of a recall is getting to you from me, who got it from cars.com, who got it from the manufacturers, there’s already been serious enough problems with your type of car that very serious people are willing to lose money fixing the problem for free.

Yeah, and it’s free to get these things fixed. So, you really have no excuse. Otherwise, you may end up with a problem like I had. And you may need one of those lawyers.

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